Stages of Relapse

relapse stages

Recovering from addiction is not an easy process and rarely goes according to plan. Often, by the time people have reached the stage where they seek addiction treatment at a rehab center, they have already tried and failed to defeat their addiction to drugs and alcohol on their own. Relapses are a normal, but dangerous phase many people experience during recovery.

 

Long-term and even sometimes short-term substance abuse results in changes to the way the brain operates. This causes those who struggle with addiction to actively and compulsively seek out substances despite the adverse consequences of using it. The time it takes for the brain to restore a “normal” function can range for months to years, depending on the severity of a person’s addiction. During that time, everyday triggers and overwhelming cravings can lead to relapse. 

 

What Is a Relapse in Addiction?

Statistics show between 40% and 60% of individuals in recovery experience at least one incidence of relapse. Some may experience several before successfully attaining and maintaining sobriety. Where addiction is concerned, a relapse is the downward spiral back into compulsive behavior and addiction. A relapse does not occur suddenly. It is not like a broken bone or a car accident. Relapse is generally a combination of several events or repeated exposure to triggers that lead an individual to reach for drugs or alcohol as a way to cope. Historically, their substance of choice has been their methodology for coping during stressful or emotional times. Therefore, they reach for that same substance when their current situation has become too difficult to handle. 

 

Often there are a variety of signs and symptoms one might exhibit when experiencing a relapse. Some of the most common include destructive thoughts, compulsive behavior, a return to unhealthy behaviors or environments, mood swings, recurrence of previous mental health symptoms, and isolation from groups or activities. 

 

What Are the Stages of the Relapse Process?

As previously mentioned, relapse is a process. It often takes weeks or even months before someone “slips” for the first time after leaving a treatment program. There are several steps to the stages of the relapse process that one goes through before fully relapsing, and those have been divided into three phases to make it easier to understand. 

 

Emotional Relapse

The first stage of relapse is emotional relapse. During this stage, a person has not returned to or even considered drinking or using yet. However, during emotional relapse, they do not practice the coping behaviors or self-care techniques they were taught during treatment to help cope with triggering events and maintain their sobriety. 

 

Some signs of emotional relapse may include distancing oneself from supportive friends or family, attending recovery meetings, but not participating and mood changes. The lack of proper self-care during emotional withdrawal often leads to feelings of unhappiness, negative emotions, and increased levels of stress; All of which cause them to use in the past. As inadequate self-care continues, a progression into mental relapse occurs. 

 

Mental Relapse

During the mental relapse phase, people begin to consider turning to drugs or alcohol to cope. Because they know using is not a healthy or positive solution, they try to use the coping behaviors learned during therapy; however, a negative mental state often overpowers learned protective factors. 

 

During this second stage of relapse triggers such as places, people, and events associated with past addictive behaviors can trigger cravings. During mental relapse, addicts in recovery may minimize the adverse side effects of drinking or using. Also, they may start to look for opportunities to relapse or even make a plan to relapse.

 

Physical Relapse

The final stage of relapse is physical relapse. This stage begins when the person uses again or “slips.” Sometimes, immediately after a slip, people regret using or drinking and find an even more powerful passion for recovery. Still, for others, this may not be the case. 

 

It is essential to seek recovery after a slip to prevent a potentially dangerous spiral back into addiction. Those who do not seek treatment after a slip will generally experience physical relapse (withdrawal). To avoid the symptoms associated with the stage of relapse, they often turn to obsessive or compulsive substance use. 

 

Learn Coping Mechanisms at Soba Texas

Achieving sobriety can be difficult. The first and most crucial step is to seek treatment. At Soba Texas, in San Antonio, we offer an affordable substance abuse treatment program in a luxury setting. Our team of highly trained addiction treatment professionals understands how challenging the decision to seek treatment can be. But we also know detox and therapy at a center like Soba Texas is the safest and most effective way to defeat addiction. If individualized one-on-one treatment at a renowned residential treatment is the next step for you, contact Soba Texas today. 

 

Support Groups for Parents of Addicts

support group for family

Addiction is currently a serious public health problem in the United States. Addiction has been better understood in the past few years as a disease, but addiction is not only a disease that the individual addict struggles with—addiction is a family disease. Addiction hurts everyone with a relationship to the addict. Parents of addicts especially are confronted by the challenges of navigating relationships with their children struggling with substance abuse. However, the increased recognition of addiction as a family disease has resulted in an increase of resources designed to not only help parents find their loved one help to tackle addiction, but also to help for parents of addicts themselves. 

 

Addiction Is a Family Disease

At Soba Texas, we can’t stress enough that addiction is often referred to as a family disease because it doesn’t only affect the individual struggling with substance abuse, it also impacts the loved ones of the addict. Parents of addicts in particular struggle with a complex mix of emotions when faced with the realities of their loved ones’ addiction, whether their child is a minor or an adult. Parents of addicts may take on the guilt, blame, or shame belonging to the addict, or experience these emotions as a result from embarrassment.

 Parents of addicts can also easily be engrossed in the behavior of an addict, hyper-focusing on their child’s addictions and trying to fix them. If they are close to their loved one, parents of addicts may bear the brunt of unpleasant behaviors their loved ones exhibit as a result of their addiction. Addiction can also affect the marriage of parents of addicts. Most of all, like any parent, parents of addicts are faced with a situation where their child is facing a dangerous disease that they may feel powerless or hopeless against. If you have a child struggling with addiction, you are not alone—there are several resources that offer help for parents of addicts. One of the most invaluable resources is support groups for parents.

 

Support Groups for Parents of Addicts

Parents of addicts may feel alone in their experiences with their child’s addiction, but support groups for parents of addicts can help combat these feelings. It is common for parents of addicts to focus on the addicted loved one rather than themselves, however, support groups for parents can offer them emotional support in navigating their loved one’s addiction.

 

Al-Anon

Al-Anon is one of the oldest support groups for family members of someone with a drinking problem. Al-anon offers free family groups open to any family member of an alcoholic looking for support. Meetings are usually one hour where attendees are encouraged to listen, learn and share, if they’re comfortable doing so. All meetings are anonymous and confidential is a foundational aspect of the groups. Al-Anon uses an adapted version of the Twelve Steps of Alcohols Anonymous as a tool for healing and growth for family members of addicts. Though Al-Anon family groups are not specifically for the parents of addicts, they are often among the family members of addicts that attend the meetings. The meetings can offer help for parents of addicts in finding validation of their experiences by individuals who have intimate understanding of the same issues through their own experiences. If you are interested in attending an Al-Anon Family Group, you can begin by looking for a group in your community on their webpage. 

 

Nar-Anon

Whereas Al-Anon is for family and friends of individuals with dependency on alcohol, Nar-Anon is for the family and friends of those with dependency on drugs. Though the stories of how addiction to alcohol impacts families are similar to those of addiction to drugs, the stories at Nar-Anon focus specifically on drug use rather than alcohol. Nar-Anon similarly uses a Twelve Step Program to help family and friends of addicts find strength and hope. Nar-Anon does not require dues or fees and though its membership is not limited to parents of addicts, many attend the meetings. If you are interested in joining a Nar-Anon group, you can begin by looking for a family group in your community. 

 

PAL (Parents of Addicted Loved Ones Group)

Unlike Al-Anon and Nar-Anon, Parents of Addicted Loved Ones, or PAL, is a support group specifically for parents of addicts. PAL was created based on the recognition that parents have a different relationship to the addict than a sibling, friend, or spouse. When confronted with a loved one addicted to drugs or alcohol, parents have the tendency to revert to treating adult sons or daughters like younger children. PAL acknowledges this reaction to addiction is unique to parents and uses nine individual non-sequential lessons in meetings that teach about addiction both from an addict’s and a parent’s perspective. 

 

How to Get Your Loved One Help

Al-Anon, Nar-Anon, and PAL are all useful support groups for parents of addicts. But it is important to remember these are non-professional support groups, meaning they offer a space for members to share their experiences, hope and strength—they do not offer professional treatment for addicts. If you’re seeking help for your loved one’s addiction, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, is the agency leading the public health effort to combat substance abuse and offers a range of resources. 

 

Get Help With Addiction at Soba Texas

If you’re looking for professional treatment for a loved one’s addiction, Soba Texas is also here to help. We offer companionate, quality addiction treatment services in San Antonio, Texas. Please contact us for information about how we can help. Our professionals are here to help individuals and their families get through drug and alcohol addiction. 

A Brief History of the Opioid Epidemic

history of the opioid epidemic

Soba Texas understands the importance of spreading awareness of the opioid epidemic in America. Today we’ll share a brief history of the opioid epidemic; how the U.S. got to this point in the first place; and what we have done to contribute to societal improvements during the epidemic. 

 

Opioid Crisis History and Background

Opium made its first appearance in the US in 1775. During the civil war, opioids were used to treat pain caused by battle wounds. Consequently, numerous soldiers became addicted to opiates. Resulting in lawmakers passing The Harrison Narcotics Act in 1914 to prevent recreational use of opioids. In the 1970’s, the stigma about addiction caused by opioids was so severe that doctors and surgeons ceased the use of narcotic agents for pain treatment. Opioids made a strong comeback in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, when drug manufacturers published statements promoting the use of opiate drugs by assuring the medical community that prescription opioids did not cause patient addiction. This led to a tremendous increase in opioid prescriptions. 

 

What’s Happening Today in the Opioid Epidemic

In 2017, the Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency to address the national opioid crisis. Here are some of the most recent statistics according to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Since 1999, more than 750,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Overdose deaths include prescription opioids, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl.
  • In 2018, 47,000 cases of opioid overdoses resulted in death, with 32% of those deaths involved prescription opioids.
  • In 2018, the states with the highest rates of opioid overdose deaths were West Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New Hampshire
  • 2018 data also shows that 128 people in the United States died from opioid overdose every day.

This is just a brief snapshot of the big picture. Mortality rate, without any doubt, is one of the gravest consequences of the opioid epidemic in the US. However, the opioid crisis also imposes an immense effect on general welfare of the community. Not to mention, the economic impact that it has on our society in addition to the emotional and psychological effects on the patients’ family and their loved ones. 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and National Institutes of Health (NIH)’s stand during the opioid epidemic: 

With the goal to alleviate problems caused by the opioid epidemic and formulate solutions to improve how the U.S healthcare system should be dealing with this crisis, HHS and NIH focus their efforts into five major priorities:

  • Improving access to treatment and recovery services
  • Promoting use of overdose-reversing drug 
  • Strengthening public understanding of the epidemic through better public health surveillance
  • Providing support for cutting-edge research on pain and addiction 
  • Advancing better practices for pain management 

As the U.S. is providing efforts to alleviate the devastating damage, we at Soba Texas provide more education for the general public and potential patients through our blog. In addition to that, a representative is available on-line 24/7 to answer any questions or concerns that potential clients and their families may have without compromising their privacy. We create a safe space for people to talk and to reach out if they are seeking treatment for themselves or for their loved ones. Our staff is expertly trained in educating and discussing treatment plans while providing realistic expectations and being emotionally supportive. 

 

Soba Texas Is Here to Help You

From day one, our core focus is being caring. Here at Soba Texas, you are not just a client, you are one of us. That is why we use a combination of different modalities to optimize your recovery treatment and provide you with the most holistic care. In addition to medication-assisted therapy, we utilize psychological counseling, acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy. 

Unfortunately, the stigma of addiction and addiction treatment still exist. Soba Texas is here to contribute efforts to erase that stigma. We ensure a judgment-free zone for anyone who comes here to seek treatment or know someone who is dealing with addiction disorder. 

 Soba Texas thrives on providing gold-standard treatment along with education. We are a Joint-Commission accredited facility with top of the line treatment modalities. Not only do we satisfy the national guidelines on substance abuse treatment, we go above and beyond to exceed the requirements. Should you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to our knowledgeable staff. We are here for you! 

A Letter From the Addict to the Addiction

For many, cutting ties with an addiction is similar to breaking up a long-term relationship. Going through detox and addiction treatment is effective, but it’s common to enter sobriety feeling like there are unresolved issues. After all, you’ve spent a significant amount of time entertaining your addiction with drug abuse, and you’ve likely let other relationships fall to the wayside as a result.

Like all unhealthy relationships, it’s time for you to end things with your addiction once and for all. It starts with you confronting your addiction head on. 

A Letter to Addiction

Ongoing counseling and participation in addiction recovery programs is recommended long after your initial treatment ends. However, you may also find it useful to express your feelings via a letter. Your own thoughts and feelings will be unique, but here is an example that you may find helpful:

Dear Addiction;

For a time, it felt like all I needed in the world was you. For much of our time together, I felt happy and free of other desires. My pain seemed to go away, and I didn’t worry about life. I even let my other relationships disintegrate because of how strongly I felt towards you. 

I now know that none of these feelings were genuine and that I was being manipulated throughout our time together. Whenever I felt like you were the key to getting through life, it was nothing more than a lie. For this and many more reasons, it is now time to bid you “goodbye” forever.

You see, I am so much more than just another person risking their life through drug abuse, and I will not be a statistic. As good as I felt when I was with you at times, I felt terrible during others. I missed out on important events and gave up things that once meant a lot to me. I hit some of the lowest points in my life, and I now realize that I am worth more. It is time for me to regain control. I will pursue new opportunities, achieve new goals and adopt a healthy lifestyle. And to do all of this, I need you out of my life. 

That said, I know I cannot blame you entirely for the way things have gone. Just as I am working to regain control in my life, I am also taking responsibility. I chose to start our relationship, and now I am choosing to end it. I know that saying “goodbye” to you for good will take hard work, but I am doing exactly that. 

I will also apologize to those whom I have hurt because of how you influenced me. The relationship between you and I may be at an end, but it is not too late for me to rebuild my relationships with my family members and friends. 

As challenging as this ending may be, I know it is the right thing to do. I look forward to new beginnings, and you and I will never cross paths again. Goodbye. 

Writing Your Own Letter

The letter above is just an example, and yours should be focused on your own experience and feelings. It’s okay to feel sad while writing your letter, but it’s also important to focus on the good things that are about to come. Writing your letter is already a major sign of progress. 

What you do with your completed letter is up to you. Many people choose to keep the letter in a safe place where they can revisit it occasionally for inspiration or to see how far they’ve come since writing it. Others choose to destroy their letters as a sign of being done with their addiction once and for all. 

If you write your letter as part of an addiction treatment group or in a counseling session, you may be able to share it with others. Doing so can help you relate to others suffering from drug abuse and help you realize you are not alone. Your letter can also serve as a source of inspiration for others. 

It’s Not Too Late to Get Help

Grappling with an addiction is not easy, but it is not something you have to keep living with. With the right treatment and addiction recovery plan, you can successfully achieve a life of sobriety. If you are in the San Antonio, TX area, and are looking for the right addiction treatment program, our team at Soba Texas is here for you. We offer comprehensive detox and inpatient treatment for drug abuse, and if you’re reading this, it is not too late to get the help you need. Reach out to us today to learn more about our services!

How To Quit Using Benzos

Addiction is a serious disease that doesn’t differentiate based on race, gender, or background. It comes in many forms and can impact anyone at any time. There are a few drugs that are particularly addictive, such as benzodiazepines, which are also known as benzos. If you or someone you know is suffering from a benzo addiction, please seek professional help. Benzos can change one’s life drastically and are extremely addictive. Benzo abuse can also be detrimental to one’s health and is very dangerous

What are Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines, also known as benzos, are a common class of prescription medication that is used to treat a variety of medical conditions. Some of the most common forms of benzos are diazepam, lorazepam, Klonopin, and Xanax.  Benzos have two major medical applications. First, benzos are used to stop someone who is having seizures. A seizure takes place when the neurons in the brain start to fire out of control. There are different kinds of seizures such as tonic-clonic, gran mal, and absence seizure. 

The other major application of benzos comes in the form of anxiety management. If someone is having a panic attack, benzos such as the commonly prescribed Xanax, stop the panic attack from continues. This medicine is short-acting and can stop a panic attack in its tracks; however, this medication is also incredibly addictive. Benzos are supposed to be prescribed as an emergency use only pill, but people prescribed can end up taking them every day.  The longer someone abuses benzos, the more likely they’ll become addicted. It’s really not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. There are certain signs and symptoms one can look out for when it comes to an addiction to benzos. 

What are the Signs & Symptoms?

If someone develops an addiction to benzos, there are a few signs and symptoms that people might note. First, someone who suffers from an addiction to benzos will end up going to the doctor more often than usual. This takes place because someone is going to need a prescription to pick up benzos. Then, that individual might end up going through prescriptions of benzos faster than they should. 

As the addiction worsens, individuals are going to develop mood swings, become increasingly lethargic, and experience slurred speech. They will do anything they can to feed that addiction. When the doctor stops writing prescriptions, someone who suffers from an addiction is going to turn to buying them off the streets. This can directly impact someone’s financial situation as they’re paying out of pocket for the drugs versus using insurance. 

How to Quit

The safest and most effective way to quit using benzos is to seek help from a trained medical professional. Stopping cold turkey is extremely dangerous and can cause health complications, such as seizures. If someone is addicted to their prescription, they can go to the doctor prescribing the medicine and asked to be tapered off. Being “tapered off” means the doctor will determine a smaller dose to give the person, then a smaller dose after that, to gradually get this person off the drug. 

If someone is addicted to benzos that they’re buying off the street, they can also go to a doctor and seek help or they can go to a drug rehab for detox. During detox, the person will also be tapered off the drug, under medical supervision 24 hours a day. Detox at a rehab isn’t only for people who are purchasing benzos illegally, it is for anyone who is addicted regardless of if they have a prescription or not. 

Completing detox at a rehab then attending an inpatient rehab is one of the best ways to ensure someone will get sober and stay sober. During treatment, the addict learns the coping skills needed to stay sober and also gains a support group. Having the support of friends and family is important when getting sober, but having a sober community is even more important for beating a benzo addiction.

Let Us Help!

At Soba Texas, we are a drug & alcohol treatment program located in San Antonio, TX. We offer detox and inpatient treatment programs that help people overcome addiction. At Soba Texas, we provide a unique luxury program that combines traditional addiction treatment with modern therapies to assist clients in overcoming substance abuse for good. If you are interested in learning more about how our program can help you overcome the chains of addiction, contact us today!

An Open Letter About My Addiction

From,

Anonymous 

I had been struggling with drug abuse and addiction for years. My drug of choice was alcohol. I didn’t realize just how bad the problem was. When I look back on it, it seems like it began with a glass of wine before bed. Gradually, this glass of wine got bigger. It grew to the size of souvenir sports cups that they sell at stadiums. I used to tell myself, and my wife, that it wasn’t that bad. It was mostly ice. I knew this was a lie.

The problem got progressively worse. My kids grew up and left the house. I felt as though I just wasn’t needed anymore. Sure, the kids called home from time to time; however, it was always to ask for money. I felt like my life had run its course. I started to drink more. I was bored. That was the honest truth. I was simply bored and alcohol made it easier to pass the time. 

It then got out of control. One night, I was looking over the receipt from vacation and realized that, somehow, I had charged 90 alcoholic drinks to the room in the span of 14 days. I tried to blame it on my oldest child. He was 21 at the time. I don’t know why I thought that would work. He stayed in a different room and didn’t drink despite being in college. 

I hit rock bottom when one night my wife came home and found me passed out next to the bed. She had to call the doctor who lived next door for help. I woke up in the intensive care unit with a breathing tube down my throat. That was my rock bottom. It was time to ask for help. Little did I realize just how much my life would change after I got sober. 

My Relationships with My Friends and Family Got Better

Look, I’m not here to tell you that the journey to sobriety is going to be easy. Addiction recovery is hard. There were times when I fought with my family. I didn’t want to go to an inpatient facility. My life was at home; however, it was important. When I finally took my sobriety seriously, my relationship with my friends and family got better. They got better because I no longer felt like I had anything to hide. I no longer felt like they were always looking to see if I was drinking again. I was able to let my guard down and just be myself without anything to worry about. This made my life so much easier. The guilt was gone.

I Discovered Who I Am

If you are struggling with sobriety and want to take the path to addiction recovery, you need to know that who you are when you are under the influence of drugs and alcohol is not you. You are a totally different person from that individual. When you are under the influence of drugs and alcohol, you are going to do things that are totally out of character. You are going to say things you don’t mean. You are going to engage in activities that you wouldn’t otherwise try. Instead, you are a totally different person when you find sobriety. During your road to addiction recovery from alcoholism and drug abuse, you’re going to find out just who that person is.

I Found Out What I Wanted

For years, all I cared about was how long it was going to be until I had my next drink. I would count down the hours. I would count down the minutes. I would even count down the seconds as I filled my glass. I couldn’t wait to satiate the addiction growing inside of me. Once I conquered my addiction, I found out what I truly wanted. I no longer wanted to have that next drink. Instead, I wanted to travel the world. I wanted to see my kids graduate school. I wanted to spend more time with my family members and friends. I wanted to see the world clearly for the first time. I realized that all of this was possible because I had found my sobriety. You can as well.

How My Journey to Sobriety Began

My journey to sobriety started with a single step. It starts by asking for help. You should ask for help as well. Lean on your family members and friends but also appreciate the role that trained professionals are going to play. Soba Texas is a drug & alcohol treatment program located in San Antonio, TX. Soba Texas offers a unique luxury program that combines traditional treatment and modern therapies to assist clients in conquering their addiction. Contact us today!

Top Ten Ways to Kick Cocaine

Kicking the cocaine habit is difficult due to the mental and physical effects it has on the body. You need both medical and psychological help to get you through the withdrawal effects of this drug. When it comes to quitting, though, you are not alone. Evaluate these ten ways to see which can help you the most to kick coke to the curb. You may need to try several to get over your addiction.

1. Stopping Cold Turkey or Detoxing

Generally, stopping cold turkey is the least preferable way to quit cocaine because doing so can cause serious side effects. These side effects can include severe drowsiness, agitation, suicidal thoughts, anxiety, depression, and paranoia. The mental effects of stopping coke may be serious enough to require a doctor’s intervention to keep you from hurting yourself.

If you want to stop cold turkey, consider checking yourself into a medically supervised detox facility. The doctors and nurses on hand will ensure that you get the support you need as your body goes through withdrawal.

2. Social Support Groups

While you go through withdrawal, you will need help to work through the emotions that emerge during quitting. Talking about your feelings and experiences with others who are going through the same steps may help you to power through the withdrawal stages and after.

3. Find Replacements for Cocaine

Because substance abuse no longer holds your life hostage, you will have more time on your hands. Unless you find something to fill that time with, you may go back to using drugs. Take the time during recovery to try out new hobbies, such as playing an instrument, knitting, or volunteering. Working with your hands can distract you when you experience cravings.

4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychological technique that helps patients to change how they respond to specific situations. For addiction treatment, if you used cocaine in certain situations, by going through CBT, you will learn to do other things than turn to drugs. If you choose a formal counseling program or therapist, most use this therapeutic technique. Even 12-step programs integrate elements of CBT into their methods.

5. Motivational Incentives

For some people, motivation helps. Create rewards for yourself that correspond to times without coke. For example, you may use the money saved on drugs to buy yourself a new video game or jacket if you go for a week without using drugs. You may also increase the incentives to encourage yourself to extend the length of time you go cocaine-free. Perhaps you invest in the down payment for a new car after lasting a year of living cleanly.

6. Balance Your Life

Your life will get turned upside down when you stop using cocaine. The parties you once went to will no longer be options for you because you may feel too tempted to use drugs again. Part of getting over substance abuse is discovering how to keep yourself balanced.

Get regular exercise, develop good sleep habits, and eat a healthy diet. These activities will keep your body and mind healthy. They will also replace some of the time you once devoted in your schedule to drug use. If you used coke to improve your mood or energy levels, healthier living will replace it to give you more energy.

7. Unfriend Some People

Carefully examine your life, and if you have friends who encouraged you in your addiction, break ties with them. People who push you toward self-destructive behaviors, like substance abuse, are not friends.

To keep yourself from feeling lonely, look for activities in your area that do not require drugs where you can make friends. Sign up for a softball league, visit a house of worship, or volunteer your time. Making friends outside drug-use activities can make quitting easier.

8. Identify and Eliminate Triggers

Triggering events, feelings, locations, and people can be difficult to avoid, especially if you retain your old routine while trying to quit. You need to assess your life and identify times when you would use coke. If you only used it as a party drug, you should avoid going to parties for a while. For some people, the trigger may have been stress in their life. Getting more exercise or meditation to reduce stress can help remove that trigger. Talk to your therapist about possible triggers and how you can get those out of your life.

9. Check Into an Intensive Treatment Facility

If you have a serious addiction, check yourself into a substance abuse treatment facility. Though in 2013, only 6% of people in rehab centers had a cocaine addiction, 68% of those use more than one drug.

The advantage of professional treatment facilities is the access you have to a variety of services, such as CBT, intensive individual therapy, family therapy, psychodynamic group therapy, and more. At addiction recovery facilities, you can detox from coke, begin therapy, and discover ways to stay drug-free for life.

10.  Keep Trying

Unfortunately, those who recover from reliance on coke may experience a relapse. In fact, between 40% and 60% of those who recover once will relapse. Don’t let this discourage you because it reflects the recurrence rate of serious medical issues like asthma or high blood pressure, which can have a recurrence of 50% to 70%.

Get the professional addiction treatment you need to recover from your problem in a relaxing, luxurious setting. Contact us at SOBA Texas today for more information on our cocaine and other substance addiction recovery programs.

The Top Five Signs of Drug Addiction

Drug abuse and addiction are among the most significant problems facing the modern healthcare system today. Those who have watched a loved one struggle with drug addiction know just how quickly this problem can tear someone’s life apart. On the other hand, the problems related to drug abuse and addiction tend to start slowly and insidiously. They are typically easy to overlook. It might start with someone who struggles to battle a simple injury and illness. Then, it balloons into a tremendous problem that can take someone’s entire life down with them, impacting family members and friends along the way.

Therefore, it is critical for everyone to know about the common signs that indicate drug abuse is a serious issue. Knowing these signs ahead of time will help everyone get the help they need as early as possible.

The Cravings and Relapses are Real

One of the most significant signs of serious drug abuse is the development of cravings that will lead to a relapse. For example, anxiety and depression are common side effects that come with cravings for an addictive substance. Difficulty concentrating is another common sign. At first, people will promise to give up drugs and say they can do it on their own. Then, when the going gets tough, the cravings start and these symptoms start to set in. That is when the drug use is going to abandon all promises and go off in search of drugs again. Even though someone might say that he or she can quit anytime, this simply isn’t the case. He or she will need help to quit for good.

Tolerance Begins to Develop

Another common sign of drug abuse and addiction is the development of something called tolerance. This is the term used to describe the body getting used to having drugs in its system. At first, someone might not need a lot of the substance to achieve the intended effect. People can get high with a relatively small amount.

Then, as someone uses drugs more and more often, they are going to need more drugs to achieve the same effect. This is because the body is getting used to the substance and is developing something called tolerance.

When someone needs more of the drug, this is going to lead to bigger changes in someone’s life. This is going to impact that person’s appearance, eating habits, finances, and more.

The Lifestyle Begins to Change

As tolerance sets in, someone’s lifestyle is going to change. This is going to lead to risky behavior. This is because the person is going to place anything and everything else second to drug use. They might even engage in activities that they wouldn’t otherwise. This is going to include activities such as using drug paraphernalia, stealing from others, sharing needles with people, and more. This is going to impact both personal and professional relationships. Their physical health is going to be in jeopardy. This is where others are going to have to step in and help their family member or friend.

Motivation is Going to be Impacted

Gradually, someone who is addicted to drugs is going to start to ignore life’s other responsibilities. This might mean dropping out of school. This could mean ignoring work responsibilities. Motivation is going to be at a minimum and is going to strain relationships with family members and friends as well. All of this is going to be sacrificed at the altar of drug use. For this reason, everyone needs to keep an eye out for a drop in motivation or changes in someone’s memory. These are hallmark signs of drug abuse.

The Development of Withdrawal

When someone goes for any length of time without having drugs in the body, withdrawal symptoms are going to set in. This is going to come as a result of detox symptoms. The symptoms are going to vary from drug to drug; however, there are a few common themes. For example, sweats, shakes, and irritability and going to be common. Someone is going to have trouble sleeping as he or she goes through withdrawal. These symptoms can be unbearable and some might even lead to seizures. Those who are going through withdrawal are often going t to be begging for drugs. This is where the help of trained professionals is going to be needed.

Rely on the Professionals from Soba Texas for Addiction Treatment

Anyone who has a loved one dealing with drug abuse knows that this is a serious problem that requires help from trained professionals. That is where Soba Texas can be of assistance. This is a professional drug and alcohol treatment program that is located in San Antonio. Combining proven methods with an innovative twist, Soba Texas offers detox and inpatient assistance for those in need. To learn more call or visit the website today.